8. Shukri Klinaku, Naim Syla, Bashkim Ziberi, Zeqë Tolaj, Leutrim Klinaku, Astrit Vuthaj, and Jon Klinaku, Measurement of the relative velocity between an electromagnetic wave and its source/observer using the Doppler effect

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Volume 33: Pages 438-443, 2020

Measurement of the relative velocity between an electromagnetic wave and its source/observer using the Doppler effect

Shukri Klinaku,1 Naim Syla,1 Bashkim Ziberi,2 Zeqë Tolaj,1 Leutrim Klinaku,3,a)

Astrit Vuthaj,1 and Jon Klinaku1

1University of Prishtina, Rr. George Bush 31, 10000 Prishtina, Kosovo

2University of Tetova, Rr. Ilinden nn, 1200 Tetova, North Macedonia

3University of Business and Technology-UBT, 10000 Prishtina, Kosovo

 

The velocity of light is independent of the velocity of its source/observer. But the relative velocity between light and its source/observers is dependent on the velocity of the light source/ observer, and this does not conflict with the first assumption. The velocity of light is c everywhere and for everyone, but velocities c þ v and c _ v, where v is the velocity of a light source/observer, do not represent the velocity of light, but the relative velocity between light and its source/observer. The velocity of light can, thus, be added to and subtracted from any velocity—giving a measurable relative velocity. A simple and common proof for this is the Doppler effect or the working of the Doppler radar. If there were no relative velocity between the electromagnetic wave and its source/observer, then there would be no Doppler effect nor would the Doppler radar work. In this paper, we will measure experimentally the relative velocity between the electromagnetic wave and the source/observer, using the Doppler effect.

 

La vitesse de la lumière est indépendante de la vitesse de sa source/observateur. Mais la vitesse relative entre la lumière et sa source/ses observateurs dépend de la vitesse de la source lumineuse/de l’observateur, et cela n’est pas en contradiction avec la première hypothèse. La vitesse de la lumière est c partout et pour tout le monde, mais les vitesses est la vitesse d'une source lumineuse/observateur, ne représentent pas la vitesse de la lumière, mais la vitesse relative entre la lumière et sa source / observateur. La vitesse de la lumière peut ainsi être ajoutée et soustraite de toute vitesse - donnant une vitesse relative mesurable. Une preuve simple et courante en est l'effet Doppler, ou le fonctionnement du radar Doppler. S'il n'y avait pas de vitesse relative entre l'onde électromagnétique et sa source/observateur, alors il n'y aurait pas d'effet Doppler, et le radar Doppler ne fonctionnerait pas. Dans cet article, nous mesurerons expérimentalement la vitesse relative entre l'onde électromagnétique et la source/observateur, en utilisant l'effet Doppler.

 

Key words: Relative Velocity; Doppler Effect; Electromagnetic Wave; Doppler Radar.

Received: August 14, 2020; Accepted: October 1, 2020; Published Online: October 20, 2020

 

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